‘We have to be ready’ for influx of newcomers, say residents at Wake Transit meetings; 7 more to go!

Intertwined among the many reasons residents recently attended public meetings to hear more about the 10-year Wake County Transit Plan were a thread of fear and a measure of relief: fear about the continuing fire hose of newcomers potentially overwhelming our roads and relief that voters have chosen to invest in solutions.

“It’s nice to be living somewhere where you don’t have to twist somebody’s arm to see why it’s worthwhile to invest taxpayer money in public transportation,” said Gaby Lawlor, who moved to Raleigh from New Jersey with her husband a month ago. “I have high hopes for this area. Since we’ve been here, everything has reaffirmed our decision to move to Raleigh.”

Both Lawlor and Nathan Spencer, left, who moved his family from Boston to Raleigh four years ago, chose Wake County because of the numerous accolades it has received about being one of the best places to live in the country. But both are concerned about whether the area has the infrastructure to accommodate those who follow them.

“What’s coming the next two years is going to be insane,” said Spencer, 36. “I would expect in the next two years a correction in the market, and a lot of people my age and younger are going to be looking at the rent in Boston, New York, San Francisco, and saying, ‘I don’t want to do this again. I don’t want to live outside my means.’ They’re going to google the best city to work in, and they’re going to find Raleigh. We have to be ready.”

Otis Allen, a retiree living in Southeast Raleigh, wants to make sure that those who rely on public transportation to go about their daily lives remain a focus as the county continues to grow. Read more